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education and retirement. >> on the tax side, as part of the adults of a solution, to you think the gap between the way work is tax and investment and capital gains are taxed -- does that have to narrow as part of the final solution? >> i think so. capital gains going up 20%, some people suggest even more. that is something we should look at. there is concern about that. the differential is one of the reasons why will the americans pay so little. ann romney be one of them. it is not really fair. he thought it was -- mitt romney being one of the imperious -- to being one of them. >> on the other side of the leisure, they never released a math and with a scribbled all of the house -- on the other side of the ledger him, they never released a nafta and where they scribbled on of the ideas. we have had an election. shut those two ideas still be on the table the that the president -- should those two idea still be on the table when the president and the speaker are in the room together? >> it doesn't have to be done right now. it is not as much risk. we should deal with it and we should. whe
of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier. i am concerned about confidence being fragile. todd reference what happened until august of 2011. we saw in limited to lie confidence tank. market confidence grew jog with some of the market confidence plunged. i think we have to be concerned -- market confidence plunged. if we look like we are not grappling with these key challenges. what happens on january 1, everybody is saying it is a fiscal clove -- a fiscal s
an education or serve in our military. but i think we're going to be on that comprehensive. >> better than a 50% chance you have a comprehensive solution? >> i think. so i think there is going to be a subject of a lot of debate and discussion and we're going to need the scholars at the prom today and folks to help us think through this, do you take it as a series or comprehensive bill. >> i think it's hard to take an issue on which a lot of people agree and get action on it unless there's trust that some of the other issues that are maybe have less consensus have trust those issue also also get addressed. that's one of the reasons comprehensive immigration reform is attractive to ensure all the immigration issues get addressed at once. it's a reason that the senator's start up 2.0 bill is attractive is because it sees other issues. i want to pose another way that you could view the highly educated immigrant as part of a larger issue and that the non-instruction for our own students. what i see happening in many of the stitesths states and a greatly renude emphasis in why american students are n
findings of a legislative committee study. >>> plus, a conversation with an education innovator, sal khan, on a mission to bring a free world class education to anyone, anywhere. >> it's really about the student taking ownership of their own learning. >> coming up next. >>> good evening. welcome to "this week in northern california." big news today from the u.s. supreme court on gay marriage. before we get to our other topics, we'll briefly discuss that with our panelists. joining me tonight are jill tucker, "san francisco chronicle" education reporter. matthai kuruvila, also with the "san francisco chronicle." and paul rogers with "san jose mercury news." the high court announced it will review proposition 8, california's ban on same-sex marriage and the federal defense of marriage act. paul, we'll begin with you. what can we infer from this? what's the time frame? can we expect any sweeping judgments? >> well, a timeframe is the arguments are going to happen in march then we expect a decision by the end of the court session which is june 27th. it will probably go right to the very end.
. this will improve education for our children. why are you giving it a big f. >> there is no relationship between test scores and the amount of time spept in the classroom. not in math or science or in anything. u.s. students spend more time in the class rom than kid in the chin affin land and japan. that helps one person and that is the teacher unions where the recip yepts of the spending. if you want to help the kids privatize the system. before the late 1880s it was home schooled and private and more choice and better out come for all. >> john, is it worth it or the education of the kids is worth it? >> i don't think there is a correlation. i think johnathon is right here. i don't agree with privatization of all schools. 20 years we had a best education system . we still have great teachers and school accident, but as a system, we are failing and we are falling down behind other countries. you look at oecd inwe are falling back every year. it is not the amount much time, it is what they are getting while they are there. and we don't have the ability to merit base teacher or students and we hav
future, our future, the future of the city. we was discussing education in item 13, and i feel that ifl( don't fire up every channel if we don't liquidate every pipeline and search every avenue[vjld in! >> president chiu: excuse me, sir. we have a rule in the board chamber that issues that have already been discussed in committee can't be discussed in public comment today. that being said if you want to discuss education issues in general you're free to do that. >> yeah. i feel like the children that's in schoolútpÑ now they're going to be sitting in these seats, the same children so if we don't get on top of this education crisis, we're basically"wp(g÷ contributing to the demise of our own future and the future of this city. so i think that it's important that we do have the conversation about education as often as we possibly can, not just when it's time to fork over some money to the school district. i feel like we need to hold them more accountable the community, and city government. and i think we always need
education, again, to try to break the cycle. we will be using the same system and, hopefully, where we can get to later to predict with the next violence they occur and deploy resources there so that we are efficient and even more so -- we are not random in our application of our efforts to eliminate this violence. all you have to do is look at the room. it is unbelievable the amount of people that are now in the conversation, and we need to stay in the conversation. even in -- even if this current state of violence subsides, it has positioned itself, and it will come back. we will be tracking our list and anyone else who makes the list forever. you go online now, you can always find it forever. if you make our lives, we will track you in and out of the justice system. if you leave the system forever, that is fine with us, too. if anybody wants to turn in a gun, we do not need an arrest. we just want the gun. like the mayor said, if you are worried about being proclaimed somebody who is a tattle tale, that your working with police, get that gun to the clergy. they have offered to receive i
of the indian education act. she has moved beyond the limits of her duties for the families in her district. she spends time volunteers for all community functions that the alliance puts on. the families that she serves remember her fondly and all that she did for them. she offered her talents to powwows, food booths, graduations and dinners and let's watch a video on gwen stirrer. >> i am [inaudible] known as the keepers of the western door. they're on the western side of new york and they're the biggest of the tribes. i'm the one -- i'm the one that creeks that runs through our reservation now. indian community -- there was nothing in the beginning. for 20 years that i work in the school district helping the children understand that their heritage was important, and important to be proud of being indian, and so that gave them reasons to study harder and to be a better student and stay in school. where you come from is important and what your background is and your family, so we have to have indian education. i don't think i'm a hero. i just had a job to do, and did it with the chi
institutions that contribute to a stable nation state. as an educator i joined the team to oversee the portfolio of education and was given the opportunity to implement the country's education strategic plan over the southwest provinces. additionally i was given the national action plan for women and control of two female engagement teams which were marines trained to interact with the population of women because of the pashi culture, the males were not allowed to interact with the women. in order obviously to ensure communities stay strong you have to not only address the men, but you absolutely need to address the women. so we created the female engagement team. with our interagency partners, the u.s. department of state, danish and british governments and of course the afghans, additionally we reached out to the private sector for partnerships, and not for profits to deliver things that we weren't capable of delivering or to cover gaps that arose as we implemented the plan. we implemented the plan through 17 teams through helman and our two female engagement teams. this is act
like trying to improve the education system. the fund mental things are what we need to work on. not just that we are growing faster in 2013 but for many years thereafter. >> christine, you make the point all the time. first of all, education, the payback is good. when you look at the numbers and compare the average to those with college degree, it's half. the unemployment rate is half. >> i'm terrified about the kids who haven't had a chance to get in the labor market yet. they have a degree, student debt. they're not in the labor market yet. the first job you have. the first foot on. the first foot on the ladder is so important to lifetime achievement. it's a country eating your young. good education but there is an opportunity for the education once you get into the labor market. >> christine, diane, ken. thanks for joining us. good conversation about the jobs report. let's see what the future holds in terms of jobs. all right. does this man scare you? if you're a republican in congress the answer is probably yes. in the last three weeks, more lawmakers have said they are don
california is the 9th largest economy in the world and we educate one out of eight children in the united states. california currently ranks left in teacher to student ratio, we rank last in library to student to student ratio. over the last five years, 2007-08 the district has been cut by 146gjtgç million. this past year alone the state budget cuts were 77 million. for every student, the district should be receiving@gj5é $6697,0 $5204. the district has had to cut nine and a half school days to furlough days because of this. that's nine and a half less school days for us to teach reading, math, science, you name it. but yet we expect our students to graduate on time and to be just as successful as other students with"ej3w nine less instructional days. as a teacher i just want everyone to understand the pressure that you have in fulfilling your lesson plans when you have nine less days to teach the students the same amount of information that you're expected to. five years ago we were ranked 38 out of 50 in( jó the country anr people spending. today ?j x8ñ are ranked 47th. all of the s
of education, things like that. there's a definite policy choice in the state of new jersey. >> could you beat him? >> look, i think he's vulnerable. i think he's vulnerable to any democrat. his high mark in public polls that have been published, his high mark right now, he polls only at 53%. >> how would you feel if the president comes down and puts his arm around him again at the height of the battle? >> if there was a cause, a need for that, i applaud my president. new jersey is in a crisis, i want him to bond with whoever is in the governor's office. politics should be left to political seasons. governing should be done during governing season. even now before we get to next year, the election year, even now it's time to focus on governing and serving people. >> booker for senate, 2013? >> again, my focus right now is trying to figure out what that next step will be that is in accordance with my values. life is about purpose, not position. my value is i want to find whatever i do that can best make a contribution to the people in the city i love and the state i love. you and i both know th
a fire. we've worked hard to educate them, i think a lot of them get it now but it was a challenge initially. >> thank you. do you want to say anything? >> yeah, i wanted to comment on operatability within the california national guard. they worked really well within the framework that we established with cal fire and then beyond that throughout the national guard and the army, all of our aviators train to the same standards so really we're able to integrate any aircrew from any state, any component, into our program at any time because we're operating you noah cording you know, according to the same standards. back in 2008 we had a very large fire event here in california and we aircraft from 22 states responding to that. there is capability to respond within the national guard alone and we have started developing relationships with our title 10 partners, we do similar academics every year like they do so i think that helps generate interoperatability amongst the title 10 and title 32 assets within the state as well. >> well, i don't know about you all but i feel pretty comfor
support people in recovery, not only with our encouraging words but also with housing, education, and employment. recovery month events make the faces of recovery visible in the community, highlighting the fact that people in recovery are our family members, friends, and neighbors. and it underscores the need for ongoing support for those who have beat addiction and mental illness and are now living happy and productive lives in recovery. we have seen rallies, jamborees, block parties, sporting events, motorcycle rides, community walks, wellness activities, and art shows among the many events listed on the recovery month web site. participants in these events have experienced fun and fellowship. we want to thank the thousands of people responsible for organizing recovery month events. your creativity and dedication is inspiring. we are making a difference by making these events possible. it's the miracle of sobriety, but we've got to do it together, right? so can i get a big cheer for doing it one day at a time, together? (cheering) this kind of an event is not only geared to hel
organizational effectiveness and improved doctrine, education, training and exercises. the directive comes with an already increased attention on dsca which we have seen the development of courses and training now delivered at multiple professional military education programs and other venues and the maturing of thinking and policies since 9/11 and katrina. there is a recognition within this analysis that there are gaps in awareness of the capabilities dod can provide in complex catastrophes, as well as the inherent complexities and lack of understanding in our various chains of command and our authorities. the report recognizes what we have used to drive the dsca portion of fleet week, that local authorities are likely to be overwhelmed in a complex catastrophe and that the president will direct support to civil authorities. that san francisco fleet week assumption is now stated as a guiding principle inside the dod for planning and activities. the objective of the dod effort is to enable the effective access to and use of defense capabilities in the event of a disaster. critical to thi
coming together. and what we do is we work within our community to educate people about issues of humanitarian aid and world need. and as we raise our community's consciousness, we fund and we raise funds to support relief efforts all around the world. our projects focus on, education, hunger, safe drinking water, and disaster relief, and all kinds of different ways of helping people. we have ongoing projects in cambodia, haiti, and south africa and helping out in areas just as the tsunami in south east asia and the earthquake and tsunami in japan and last year, and during hurricane katrina we tributed one mill object pounds of food aid. [ applause ] >> and all of that is coming from the lgbt and friends community. so we work as ambassadors for our community and we help change people's minds and hearts about who we are and what we care about. besides providing humanitarian aid, we try to inspire hope in all of our projects and we have found that hope is really just as important as aid, if not more so. and we have worked with a lot of communities in desperate situations arounded
make sure young people can graduate, can get on to higher education, can get on the way to find a pathway into our growing economy, that right now is falling -- is causing them to fall behind. because we're not providing the kind of safety net or education program and our job placement programs that can really help bring them up. this is a choice we have today. i totally support it and i hope we can actually find the votes to have a veto proof majority in making this go forward. >> president chiu: supervisor >> supervisor olague: -- kim and her staff for all the work on this and i wanted to refer to an article that was in yesterday's paper, and it's kind of an odd title but it was black boy see bleak future at school. it stated one out of four african-american boys in california is convinced he will fail in school, driven in part by poverty and trauma according to results of a legislative inquiry. then they go on to say, the report's findings included broad summaries of how men and boys of color especially african-american and latino males fair in california. race matter. where
the european union. despite anti-discrimination laws, they have little access to education or public services in several european countries. >> we need more than just words from the e you. brussels can launch proceedings over treaty violations and holds member states to account this way and other areas, but so far, not over discrimination a menorahs. >> amnesty international nevertheless concludes that the you deserves the nobel peace prize for its peace-building policies over the past six decades. >> the very last issue of the financial times coach lynn hit the stands today with a bit of humor. >> gallows humor, that is. the front page carried the headline "finally in the black" and it was called "the final time storage line." >> but the business side has been no laughing matter. a direct losses every year since it started publication back in 2000. and finally in the black -- an ironic reference to the fact that in its entire 13-year history, "the financial times to richland" never made a profit. >> we did not have a chance to build up our readership over decades. whoever enters the market l
and educate families to achieve a healthy neighborhood, soma and greater san francisco. since we were formed in 2000 in the 13 years we have been around tenant harassment hasn't gone down. if anything, it actually escalated, especially when a lot of the tech industry has been formed or is housed in the south of market. we have over 40 tech industries there so a lot of landlord or management has been really banking on this new possible tenants. so tenant has escalated around a lot of the alleyways that a lot of our families lived in over 20 years. i want to tell you one particular stories that one of our families has actually gone through. when we say tenant harassment, this isn't just tenant harassment on adults, a lot of our youth, the children of these parents have been harassed as well. one particular story i want to tell you about is jake. he lives on mina street and his family was living in this apartment with 6 units. at first the landlord informed them that they have to leave because of foreclosure. then when we have them actually get documents from the landlord there was multip
of the resources to solve the problem. i think we need an education program by learned scholars, such as those in this audience to help us in getting this word out to america. i think it is essential because it is coming on very fast. there are things that are happening that we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines, sailors, soldiers and have the equipment without any burden to carry economy, not true. the truth of the matter is is a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national-security policy that defends the country that we love so much. without having the ability and willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this in helping giving us answers to some of the very difficult questions that they ask, i want to take this opportunity to think robby for what he does. i met him some years ago when he found my office in an office building. he came in and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he is talking about and he has never disappointed me whatsoever. what we need to
the education blob that his job of the hunt teachers' union comment janitor union, bureaucrats they're resist change that is why -- while i was excited charters schools. schools could experiment the parents would see how much better it could be and kids would benefit from the innovation. it is not happening. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the application. hn: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to burger king? >> yes. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more people involved and we needed to show more apparent support. the first application had 70 letters the second was 125 letters. still denied. john: six times. this is typical. >> it is more and more typical
's been an education process. as we started down the road i think there was an expectation all water and sewer was going to be in operation in san francisco after an ert quake. that probably is not going to happen. it's a little bit different having several blocks in your population out of water versus out of electricity or gas or cell phone service. it's a little bit different level of emergency. after an earthquake what we're designing for is to have the high level fire system more or less immediately. there may be homes, individual service connections, which could be out of water for quite some time and that's where my utility has to interface with other departments to make sure we're getting water to people through humanitarian stations, red cross, mutual aid is a huge part of this with our federal and state partners. but those hand off points after a major event and educating ourselves what we're doing and not doing is a big part of the life line process that naomi is running and it's been very, very helpful. >> thank you. and mr. angelus. >> in terms of standards, similar
and girls in their emotional, economic educational and professional spheres. one in three american women will actually have an abortion by age 45. and 99% ofenu couples have used birth control. and we know that the denial of abortion care perpetuates poverty because what we see is that women of lower income are five times more likely to have ununintended pregnancies. we have seen unfortunately in the last few years a tendency to, throughout the country to undermine the right of women to choose whether or not to have an abortion. states have actually enacted twice as many antichoice laws in 2011 as they did in any recent previous year. many states are actually still shutting down crucial reproductive health and family planning services for women throughout the country. the house of representatives recently actually voted, in its most recent session to defund title 10 which is the only federal program that is exclusively dedicated to family planning and reproductive-%( +/ health, including agencies like planned parenthood
. and education could be cut by more than $4 billion. 100,000 children could lose their place in headstart. the white house says more than 25,000 teachers and aides could lose their jobs. the national education association, it puts that number even higher, closer 2080,000 jobs lost. mark moriel is the president of the national urban league and will cain is a cnn contributor and jane zahadi is a writer at cnn money. mark, all of this, all of this, is if they go over the fiscal cliff and they don't fix it, and they never fix it, right, the worst case scenario. my question for you. so much talk about taxes for the rich but isn't it true if the sequester goes into effect and isn't fix this will d disproportionately hurt the poor? >> it would because it would be tax increases on middle and working class americans and hard cuts across the board in defense and domestic programs, including education and job training so there's -- >> 700,000 mothers and children will lose nutrition assistance and 80,000 fewer child care subsidies and 14,000 fewer homeless would receive assistance. this is what agen
monopoly of almost always do a lousy job. up against the education blob that his job of the hunt teachers' union comment janitor union, bureaucrats they're resist change that is why -- while i was excited charters schools. schools could experiment the parents would see how much better it could be and kids would benefit from the innovation. it is not happening. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the application. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to burger king? >> yes. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more people involved and we needed to show more apparent support. the first application had 70 letters the second was 125 letters. still denied. john:
address on the economy, jobs, and education policy. >> hello, everybody. over the last few weeks, there's been a lot of talk about deadlines we're facing on jobs and taxes and investments. but with so much noise and so many opinions flying around, it can be easy to lose sight of what this debate is really about. it's not about which political party comes out on top, or who wins or loses in washington. it's about making smart decisions that will have a real impact on your lives and the lives of americans all across the country. right now, middle-class tax cuts are set to expire at the end of the year. time is running out. and there are two things that can happen. first, if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1st. a typical middle-class family of four would get a $2,200 tax hike. that would be bad for families, it would be bad for businesses, and it would drag down our entire economy. now, congress can avoid all this by passing a law that prevents a tax hike on the first $250,000 of everybody's income. that means 98% of
's educational about this facility. >> fire fly by artist ned con is an art installation which rises straight from the golden gate avenue sidewalk to the top of the building. >> the fire fly wall will be 5 by 5 polley carbon plates that will move with the wind and show a wave effect in the daytime. when those also swing back and forth and they hit the fulcrum, it will also set up an led light that will cover the fire fly. so, at nighttime people in another part of san francisco can see the side of our building and about 20 feet wide and 10 stories high will be a wall that will flickr on and off like fire flies at nighttime. it will be so energy efficient that if all those lights go on, it will be the equivalent of a 40 watt bulb. and also the new piece of artwork going all the way down the side of the building, which looks like this incredible wind ripples on a pond. and i thought, oh, my god, how incredible, how wonderful. >> inside the building we will have water walls in the main staircase, and the water will be dripping through the side of the wall. you'll be able to hear it, you'll be ab
themselves actor/educators. and they're putting on a performance to help these 5th graders understand how a little issue can grow into something big and hurtful. >> she didn't show her friend her math homeworks, and her friend started to, like, exclude her from all the games and parties. >> the performance gives kids an opportunity they don't get in real life. the chance to stop the action and to discuss what's going on. >> what did you guys just see happen? yeah. >> the play is called "alice's story," and the actors perform it at different schools. it shows that bullying can happen even among friends. >> "alice's story" examines a friendship between two young girls, and how sometimes the people who you feel are closest to you can take advantage of you. >> you put that on facebook? >> yeah. and people were writing that they thought it was true. >> we wanted to give students an opportunity to put themselves in the roles of the characters and practice making decisions in case they ever found themself in a similar situation. >> and then, together, we found ways to see how the person that was
. >>> plus, how washington state is stirring the pot. >>> sex education with tony award-winning playwright, eve insler >>> beware, our fiscal policy is under attack from amoral cybords. >>> good morning, my fellow americans. i'm melissa harris perry coming to you from the msnbc studios at rockefeller center in new york city. i interrupt our program to bring you the following news. cyboergs are among us. new recording that is uncovered the extent to which these artificial entities have taken over our country. right before our eyes, they have been taking over all of our nation's institutions, slowly extending their control over our political, legal, and economic systems with their insatiable appetite for profits and prophets alone. these amoral immortals are decimating the rights of us. they are not criminals but they can live forever. even when they take a death blow, a quick cash infusion can keep them going. you may not notice them yet. soon, they will amass every single asset capable of generating hefty returns. these undead are recreating our civic and political culture in service of po
on how best to educate and otherwise care for their children with disabilities, and another provision of the treaty that can be read to obligate the united states government to pay for abortion services. >> you're just interpreting things. it never uses the word abortion, it basically says that disabled people should have the same access to health care that other people have, non-disabled people have overseas, again, we're talking about overseas. >> it does refer to reproductive rights and reproductive rights in this context has been interpreted to include abortion, and this is -- >> interpreted by you. >> -- an interpretation -- yes, and a number of other people who looked at it as well. the point is that if this does mean something, and if it could mean something that could impact u.s. law. >> but this treaty states it's not self-executing. and the u.s. supreme court has said that a non-self executing treaty doesn't create obligations that could be enforced in u.s. federal courts. >> the fact that it may be non-self executing, anderson, doesn't mean that it doesn't have any impact a
of education which the court held it was unconstitutional. so why wait until 1967 to hear the case about interracial marriage. here are all of the states that had laws on the books. banning interracial marriage. by 1967 only 16 states still had the laws on the books. in the decades between 1947 and 1967 the years the supreme court was staying mum on the issue, most states decided on their own. the court was following on their heels, following the heels of public opinion. this is a big debate in the legal world. is the supreme court influenced by american public opinion? these are nine people who could completely ignore the will of the people. they are appointed for life. they can totally ignore us if they choose. many legal experts say that's not how it works. they are swayed by what the people think about issues. they announced they would hear two cases involving same-sex marriage. that's huge. they would hear the prop 8 case out of california. that's the california ballot proposition which amended the california constitution to define marriage between a man and a woman. the court will
research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. [ male announcer ] we began serving handcrafted coffees in seattle, and people seemed to like it. so we wondered -- where else could we take this? ♪ for over 40 years, we've brought our passion for fine coffee and espresso to people everywhere. but one place was impossible, until now. our lattes, espresso and brewed coffee, now in your home. the verismo™ system by starbucks. but they haven't experienced extra strength bayer advanced aspirin. in fact, in a recent survey, 95% of people who tried it agreed that it relieved their headache fast. visit today for a special trial offer. >>> welcome back to "the ed show." one thing about republicans, they never give up. there's an assault on middle class workers in the state of michigan. it's a replay of what happened in wisconsin. rick snider backed by the cokoc brothe brothe brothers, michigan republicans rammed t
, the majority of those illegal immigrants are not even high-school educated, lacks skills, like education. my god. and they do so rejecting that law, that bill and prevent it from becoming law because they want to have a lottery. for crying out loud. the absurdities compound themselves. >> in general we have to recognize that the individual entrepreneur with special skills and contributions to american produce all the jobs, and they are the ones who are getting rich, who are punished by any increase in marginal tax rates. the already rich -- lou: what about the young man or woman in this country who is not an entrepreneur, is not a big shot, is not in middle management in a big corporation. they won a break. they won an opportunity. they want to live the american dream. why can't the republicans talk to them? >> i hink that they are being talked to. a great speech the other day in which he specifically addressed this aspiration, widespread among all americans to rise up. this is what supply-side economics is. it is surge of economics. it is not trickle-down as some people caricatured. lou: y
. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. hood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - good morning, neighbour! (yawning) strrrretch with me! reach your hands up, like this! stretch, stretch, stretch. rrrah! that felt grr-ific! come on inside! morning, dad! - morning, dan
for emergency contraception. joining me now is dr. laura burman a sex educator and a therapist and the host of in the bedroom on own. dr. burman, first of all, let me tell you i think this is probably one of the more outyaj just things i have seen this week. >> more than banning christmas. >> laura: i'm away from politics a lot this week. this? i have a young daughter and i think of a doctor telling a mom to leave the room so he can tell a young girl, maybe she is a christian girl, doesn't believe in this. her religion doesn't believe in this. telling the young girl well, if you have sex, can you use this morning after pill which includes things like dangers like thrombosis, pulmonary embolism. you can get a heart attack. you can have severe bleeding. retinal thrombosis. all sorts of hazards associated with taking that which is a big big big dose of hormones for young girls. how you can defend, this doctor? >> okay. well, first of all, i know this is a hot button topic. doctors are not telling girls if you have sex you can use this prescription. what the academy is recommending is that the
who stopped looking for work. >>> a bay area educator with only months to live is getting kindness. an 8th grader is trying to help one step at a time. >> reporter: chris mahoney's wife and son helped him battle a rare liver disease. but the principal of the charter learning center is now feeling the love of his community, thanks to this 8th grader. >> if there was any way i could help, it would be a very good idea. >> reporter: the 13-year-old is spearheading a walkathon with a silent auction for her principal. >> for her to do something this significant is kind of inspiring. >> reporter: mahoney says he's joined 750 patients on california's liver transplant list. the average wait is two years. he's waited eight months and doctors say he could die in six months without a transplant. >> in some respects it's feeling a little more desperate. >> reporter: they hope to raise $60,000 for mahoney. he's trying to get on a shorter transplant list at a hospital his insurance doesn't cover. the fundraiser takes place tomorrow from 9:00 to 3:00 in britain park from san carlos. >> i learned a
security, medicare, medicaid, education. that's not bernie sanders' point of view that is clearly what the american people believe. and the president, democrats have got to hold firm and when they do, it will finally be the republicans that come to the table rather than just the democrats caving in, as has been the case in the past. >> all right, senator bernie sanders, appreciate your time on this friday night. thank you so much for joining us. >>> coming up, the fight over the fiscal cliff is putting american jobs at risk. one of these congressional members is lying about the problem. we'll use the newest job numbers to get to the truth next. >>> and republicans in michigan are ramming through antiunion legislation and hurting middle class americans in the process. the people of michigan are outraged. we're talking to lansing, michigan mayor virg bernero. stay tuned. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "the ed >>> welcome back to "the ed show." we told you at the top of the show republicans are dragging their feet to get a tax cut deal with the american people. those republican
of chicago. that's how it happened. find those 10 people, educate them and maybe some good will come 20 years down the road. >> you mentioned the justice component of a lot of these islamist parties. there's an argument that can be made that this is a response to the corruption of these you sponsored regimes. i would say that in the case of gaza which you mentioned, rob, that was a very series component. any thoughts how to combat that or includes this in the right direction? >> for the record i'm against corruption. [laughter] , good, good, good. >> wanted to clear that up. yes, look. it goes back to the point i thought it made in my remarks that islamists didn't win and non-islamists lost, whether they were the former corrupt regimes or the divisions among the non-islamist parties today, they lose. they lose by screwing up the delivery of services. they lose by being so corrupt. they lose by being ossified. they lose, and i islamists are there like they been for eight years to take advantage of whatever opportunity, violence or through nonviolence. we didn't discuss their relationship with
-care industry, hoping to develop stellar health education, research, innovation in practice, all in the quest for great health-care you. i hope you will be able to see what we call health-care in michigan where so much investment in medical health related work has been made. beatrix hoffman is chair of history at northern illinois. she completed her ph.d. as everyone at my table did at rutgers university in 1996. she has written extensively on the history of american health care reform including a 2001 book entitled the wages of sickness, the politics of health insurance, in progress of america at the university of north carolina. in her talk today she is going to speak about her latest book, the book titled is "health care for some". i have the feeling it is relevant to our times. the talk is entitled health care for all, women, activism and women's right to health. this is a history -- her book rather and her talk today will be partly, a history of rights and rationing in the united states from the great depression to the present, and the book just came out by the university of chicago pres
that ever went to college in my family, my father had a 10th grade education. >> now that he's a successful leader of a global company, rick has not forgotten to give back, along with his wife. he created the rick and susan going foundation to provide scholarship money for the winner of the youth of the world award. >> i want to thank rick and susan as they've mentioned earlier, amazing people in the foundation, and the $50,000 scholarship which will be very helpful and i thank you for that. >> kelly: rick, a lot of people are thanking you beyond the boys and girls club. how the corporate americans show their support through sharing and civic community engagement. >> what a fantastic piece. >> kelly: always. >> jamie: egypt's once powerful military threatening to intervene with the growing crisis there, what it means in the transition to democracy. >> kelly: tragic fallout: hospital that treated the deut duchess of cambridge, and the nurse. >> jamie: and the popular hit, gangnam style, know he's apologizing about comments he made about our country. ♪ olaf gets great rewards for his small
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